Tag Archives: Andrew Lloyd Webber

Should I see Superstar?

Jesus Christ Superstar is a musical I hold very close to my heart. It was the first show I ever saw live on stage, you can read all about that experience here.

I have never seen another production on stage since that fateful night 4 decades ago! (the film I have seen multiple times) and it is a favourite musical of mine. Last time I was New York I went to see a revival of my favourite musical Hair and it was a real treat – a good production. This time it is Superstar  being revived and offers me a chance to hear those great songs live on stage once again.

The latest revival of the legendary rock opera with music by Andrew Lloyd Webber and lyrics by Tim Rice comes from a sold out production at the Stratford Shakespeare Festival in Ontario, Canada, followed by a follow-up run at the LaJolla Playhouse in San Diego, California, directed by Des McAnuff the man responsible for the mega hit Broadway production of Jersey Boys – still playing at the August Wilson theatre across the road from the Neil Simon theatre where Superstar will preach. I must admit that judging from the stills of the staging that I have seen I expect it has a similar amount of showbiz pizzaz that made Jersey Boys an enjoyable experience.

Andrew Lloyd Webber was planning his own revival but got wind of the Stratford production, went to see it, and decided it was good enough for Broadway. Here is my chance to decide for myself, do you think i should?

 

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Beware!!! Wet Paint

Theatre Review:

LOVE NEVER DIES.

Andrew Lloyd Webber’s eagerly anticipated (not by me) sequel to his megahit blockbuster musical Phantom Of The Opera has arrived in Melbourne – opening tonight at the Regent Theatre.

After receiving very mixed notices when the show opened in London in March 2010,  Sir Andrew has decided to re-tool it and Melbourne, Australia was the chosen city to stage the new incarnation, prior to landing on Broadway. If he approves of this version it could be heading to the great white way.

The Melbourne production is being “re-imagined” by an all-Australian creative team led by director Simon Phillips, designer Gabriela Tylesova and acclaimed choreographer Graeme Murphy.  They have replaced the London originators – Jack O’Brien (director), Bob Crowley (sets & costumes) and Jerry Mitchell (choroeographer).  O’Brien & Mitchell were responsible for the smash hit feel good musical Hairspray and Crowley designed Mary Poppins. An odd choice for a dark gothic sung through musical, but Sir Andrew knows best. So out with the old and in with the new!

Simon Phillips is responsible for another feel good musical – Priscilla Queen Of The Desert (me thinks another odd choice) but Gabriela Tylesova has a decent resume of clever designs in both Opera and drama. Alas the book writers (all 3 of them!!- Sir Andrew, Frederick Forsythe & Ben Elton??) remain the same, along with the lyricist and composer – well of course they would Sir Andrew has his hand in 2 of those paint tins.

So what do I think of the show? (I attended the final preview last night).

To borrow from the phrase penned by the wonderful bloggers The West End Wingers – the paint is still wet and dripping. The show is still like watching paint dry, and as we all know, “paint never dries” !!!!

Love Never Dies advances the Phantom story by 10 years and is set in New York’s Coney Island fairground in 1907. Christine Daaé is invited to perform at Phantasma, a new attraction in Coney Island, by an anonymous impresario. Along with her husband – the downtrodden Raoul (now a drunkard and gambler) and her 10 year old son Gustave (surprise surprise there is a revelation at hand – long into the show but very obvious from the beginning) they arrive in Brooklyn. Madame Giry and her daughter Meg (more Phantom alumni) turn up performing in and running a weird burlesque- come freak show at the aforementioned Coney Island, brilliantly realized in the set design. It turns out the mysterious man is of course the Phantom who wants Christine to sing for him one more time. It all sound familiar? Well it is, almost a carbon copy of the original. I was bored instantly by the storyline – or lack of it. The set kept me rapt for most of the running time (1 hr first act – 50 mins 2nd thank heaven!!). The music was derivative and no surprise, I can’t even recall a showstopper, perhaps the title song was supposed to be the one, the lyrics were incredibly banal – Glenn Slater (Sister Act – The Musical!!! and a few Disney films!!!) – well he ain’t no Sondheim that’s for sure.

The cast led by Ben Lewis as the Phantom and Anna O’Byrne as Christine are mostly fine of voice but of dubious acting talent. Sharon Millerchip as Meg Giry is a highlight, but stage veteran Maria Mercedes as Madame Giry is wasted and has a very strange end of first act moment. The small child playing Gustave was ok but Simon Gleeson as Raoul lacked acting chops. There is also a trio of freaks who comment from time to time, but they made no impact whatsoever.

I must mention that I was gobsmacked when the Phantom takes Gustave on a journey to his weird freak show lair, the synthesiser rock score pumped up and the set moved around a bit here and there, it was a blatant attempt to recreate the famous trip to the underground lair in Phantom (the boat and candle sequence) this time with Christine’s spawn. It was visually interesting but made no sense, a lot of the time the “freaks” just wandered around aimlessly on the vast stage not knowing what the hell was going on – as was I. And as for the stupid finale well go see for yourself if you dare. I was disappointed that the rollercoaster ramps and bridges didn’t produce a coaster, they just got moved around a lot rose and fell, I was expecting a “chandelier” style effect but it was not so. Overall the sets are quite beautiful and spectacular and the costumes exquisite, the lighting and sound design first rate. The choreography was not really anything to write home about.  The direction by Simon Phillips – well he does corn very well and this show is as corny and unoriginal as they come. I don’t think anyone has a chance to make the paint dry on this work of non-art.

As for the title Love Never Dies, well maybe that is so, I just wish the career and ego of Sir Andrew might succumb!!

 

 

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will the paint dry?

Love Never Dies (musical)

Image via Wikipedia

So an official announcement has been made that the sequel to the hit mega musical “Phantom Of The Opera” will have it’s second, and all new production produced in Melbourne. Titled “Love Never Dies”, but nicknamed “Paint Never Dries” by the fabulous blog –  the West End Whingers.

It is widely known that the West End production was not up to scratch, and a proposed Broadway production has been scrapped for the 2010/11 season.

An all Australian production team will helm the new version. Simon Phillips has been named as director, with Graeme Murphy in charge of choreography, sets & costumes will be designed by Gabriela Tylesova.

Lets hope it is much more successful and that the paint will finally dry.

History tells that many years ago, back in 1971 the Broadway production of “Jesus Christ Superstar” (originally a concept album) had a similar fate.

That production was not well received by the critics, and ALW himself was unhappy with the show in this form. It ran for 733 performances, admirable, but not the blockbuster hit they had hoped for.

The next production originated in Australia in May 1972. The team of director Jim Sharman and designer Brian Thomson created an all new Superstar, it was highly acclaimed and innovative and it caught the attention of ALW, lyricist Tim Rice and producer Robert Stigwood who recruited the Aussies to create the premiere London production. It once again was a new production and was a huge success running for 8 years.

Sharman and Thomson remained in London for a while after and during that time a singer in the show – Richard O’Brien asked them to produce a musical he had written called “The Rocky Horror Show” – it premiered at the Royal Court Theatre in 1973, was an instant hit and the rest is history.

The original Australian Production of Jesus Christ Superstar was certainly a landmark production. It had a very profound affect on me and in my next post I will discuss it in more detail.

 

 

 

 

 

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